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ptsd specialist

How to Comfort Yourself with Transitional Objects

In childhood psychology, Donald Woods Winnicott proposed a key concept called “transitional objects” as a phase of his developmental system.

In the “transitional object” phase, the young child begins to separate his identity from others’ identities such as his mother’s. The child will obtain an object such as a teddy bear or a blanket that is used as a defense against anxiety.

The same technique can be used for trauma survivors seeking comfort.

Watch this video to help you find your feel-good transitional object today.

Have a question? Ask Dr Anna here.

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The Inner Game of Trauma Recovery

The Inner Game of Trauma Recovery – you need to know how to do this!
1. Ask Yourself – What is it that you can do? What will make a difference?
2. Take ownership of the inner world and what you say to yourself.
3. Recognize that what you say to yourself – Your attitude makes the difference between years of suffering or growth and recovery

Have a question? Ask Dr Anna here.

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Like us on Facebook: Traumatology Institute, What is PTSD
Follow us on Twitter: @WhatisPTSD,@TraumaLine1
Connect with us on LinkedIn: Dr. Anna Baranowsky Traumatology Institute

Prediction Models for PTSD give hope for early ID & care

Learn about the early markers of stress and strain and who could benefit from early intervention.

Have a question? Ask Dr Anna here.

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Like us on Facebook: Traumatology Institute, What is PTSD
Follow us on Twitter: @WhatisPTSD, @TraumaLine1
Connect with us on LinkedIn: Dr. Anna Baranowsky Traumatology Institute

Dr. Robert T. Muller shares his personal story on the West Coast Trauma Project

dr. muller

“Be attentive to vicarious traumatization. We all are susceptible to being vicariously traumatized.”

Robert T. Muller trained at Harvard University, was on faculty at the University of Massachusetts, and is currently at York University in Toronto.

Dr. Muller was recently honored as a Fellow of the International Society for the Study of Trauma & Dissociation (ISSTD) for his work on trauma treatment. And his psychotherapy best-seller, Trauma and the Avoidant Client, in its third printing, has been translated and won the 2011 ISSTD award for the year’s best written work on trauma.

Check out the rest of Dr. Muller’s podcast here.

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