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Why You Need to Sleep More and How to Achieve This!

Getting enough sleep is crucial to your overall well being. Why?
Because it leads to overall improvements in health. Better memory, improved mood (less anxiety and depression), greater comfort in your body, fewer injuries, increased weight management and a stronger immune system (so you don’t get every cold going around)!
How do you achieve this?
1. Go to sleep and wake up at the same time each day.
2. Turn off all electronics – keep your bedroom a quiet zone.
3. Keep your room really dark.
4. Don’t go to bed upset or angry.
5. Avoid all stimulants like coffee, tea, alcohol, etc.
6. Choose L-Tryptophan rich foods like bananas, nuts/seeds, honey.
7. Use Melatonin.
8. Try these things to start with and make a commitment to 8-9 hours sleep each night!

Ask Dr. Anna S.3.E.37
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Antisocial Personality Disorder? Sociopath? Psychopath? What do they all mean?

In this video, I will introduce the Antisocial Personality Disorder. Neither Sociopaths or Psychopaths are part of the DSM-5, the diagnostic manual through the American Psychiatric Association. However, since these are widely used terms, it is helpful to understand the differences and the typical use of each term. One thing that is clear is that both Sociopaths and Psychopaths would easily meet the criteria for a diagnosis of APD.

Here is the link to a good outline of what APD is:
http://www.theravive.com/therapedia/A…)

Here are two excellent infographic links, which are worth looking more closely at:
1. http://psychologia.co/psychopath-vs-s…
2. http://www.businessinsider.com/how-to…

If you know someone with APD, Sociopath or Psychopath behaviors, please be careful. This is not something easily treated or someone whom you can love until they act better.

Ask Dr Anna S.3.E.36
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How to Defuse Someone Else’s Anger

Interacting with an angry or distressed person can evoke a ton of emotions inside of you. Maybe you feel guilty, hurt, afraid or thrown off balance. Having a simple set of intentional steps can put you back in an empowered role. From this place, you can stay connected and engage in solutions that work.

I developed the DATS approach to manage challenging interactions and I draw from this every day in my work and personal life as well.
DATS stands for Differentiate, Acknowledge, Transfer and Solution-Focused.

Here are the DATS Steps for you to use:
1. DIFFERENTIATE: You are a separate person and whatever the individual is saying to you has more to do with them than it does with you. They are bringing the issue; you are the witness. Side-step anger by not engaging at that level. Instead, make the choice to come from a place of understanding, support and non-reactivity.
2. ACKNOWLEDGE: Become a master at recognizing what the real heart of the matter is and acknowledge the feelings that go along with it. Most people coming from a place of anger are feeling vulnerable and upset. Recognize this. Here is where empathy and good listening skills are key. This is not about simply agreeing with the person, or condoning bad behavior or verbal aggression. Simply recognize the pain point. For example, you might genuinely say, “Sounds like this has been frustrating for you”, or whatever else might be true in that moment. However, don’t get stuck here because once you have accurately captured the experience of the other person, it is time to move forward toward the transfer stage.
3. TRANSFER: The previous two steps are designed to perform initial prevention of emotional escalation. The Transfer stage is used to shift the focus back onto the topic of the individual’s concern. So, here, you need to correctly capture what has happened that is the source of the problem. Make a simple statement to capture what you think you heard them tell you about the problem. Then repeat this back until you can both agree on what it is.

Ask Dr. Anna S.3. E.34

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What to do when anger bubbles up

Is anger bubbling to YOUR Surface? What can you do?
We all go through this sometimes. It happens usually when we are angry; when we feel hurt about something, let down, betrayed, fed-up, annoyed…etc.
A viewer, L.S., had a very good question about a previous video, “Your Anger is Stealing from Your Life”: “What healthy ways do you suggest for releasing anger every time it bubbles up to the surface?”

Here’s what to do when your anger bubbles to the surface.
1. First, ask yourself, “Is this really about me?”
2. Don’t assume that the best solution is to stomp it down. Your anger shows up for very important reasons. Pay attention to your anger as it will teach you something about yourself.
3. Show up for your feelings in a full bodied way. Recognize your feelings and fully embrace it. Understand that there is always a reason behind the feelings.
4. Learn to recognize that pain and hurt feelings can trigger a big dump of adrenaline/cortisol (our big stress hormones) and make us want to fight (or get angry) when, in fact, the right solution might be to face the feelings and ask ourselves to slow down and feel first, identify the true source of pain and learn to find solutions that make us feel we are drawing from the best part of who we want to be.

Dr. Christina Hibbert’s Pep Talk for Healing Trauma through Exercise

Dr. Baranowsky interviews psychologist and PTSD specialist, Dr. Christina Hibbert, about her new book, “8 Keys to Mental Health through Exercise”.

A few key takeaways…
1. Exercise does not have to always involve intense physical activity. Just trying to be more active is a great start.
2. Tackling the thoughts, beliefs and feelings behind exercising is important. Watch for how you talk yourself through the exercise and how much pressure you are putting on yourself. If you shift your mentality from “I have to exercise for 45 minutes daily” to “I’m just moving my body for mental health”, exercising will become a little easier.
3. Be gentle with yourself.
4. Pick an activity that you’re actually interested in. There is no need to copy other people.
5. Most people stick with exercising for the long term for the mental health benefits, not for the physical appearance.
6. Start small and build up. 10 minutes a day of physical activity for 2-3 days a week is a great start.

Check out Dr. Hibbert’s website here: http://www.drchristinahibbert.com/

Ask Dr Anna S.3.E.31

Have a question? Ask Dr Anna http://www.whatisptsd.com/contact-form
Full episodes: http://bit.ly/1f413L0
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